Winter Returns With A Vengeance

As we mentioned on Wednesday, a big cool-down is underway across Southern Manitoba. While we knew earlier that it was going to get cold[1], it’s beginning to become clear that it’s going to get quite a bit colder than that. Just how cold? Winnipeg might see daytime highs in the near future not seen since last January.

Friday
⇓ -13°C / -17°C
Cloudy with sunny breaks; chance of flurries
Saturday
-16°C / -26°C
Mainly cloudy with some flurries
Sunday
-21°C / -28°C
A few clouds

Today will be the coolest day in a little over a week as temperatures will slide towards –13°C by the end of the day. Skies will start out cloudy then gradually become more mixed through the day. With favourable temperature profiles, some patchy non-accumulating light snow is possible. Winds will be out of the northwest at around 15–20km/h. Temperatures will drop to near –17°C tonight.

Daytime highs will drop on Saturday to just –16 or –15°C with mixed skies. Some flurries or light snow is expected as a system slides from Saskatchewan into North Dakota, but amounts aren’t expected to be much more than a skiff at most. Temperatures will drop into the mid-minus 20’s on Saturday night.

Sunday will be a downright cold day a few clouds around. Highs will sit near –20°C through the Red River Valley and winds will be light. Expect lows dipping close to –30°C on Sunday night.

Cold Start to Next Week

The GDPS forecast shows Southern Manitoba embedded in a deep cold trough on Monday afternoon.
The GDPS forecast shows Southern Manitoba embedded in a deep cold trough on Monday afternoon.

Next week will begin with a substantial trough of cold air positioned over Southern Manitoba that will bring daytime highs in the mid-minus 20’s through the first half of the week. There may be a mid-week warm-up, but a return to colder weather would follow quickly behind. No big storms are on the horizon, so in general expect cold, dry weather to persist through the next week.


  1. On Wednesday’s post, we surmised that daytime highs would generally be near –20°C.  ↩
Brad

Brad

Brad lives in Winnipeg with his wife and two children and is the founder of A Weather Moment. He has loved weather from a very young age and has followed that passion through his life so far. He received a B.Sc. in Earth Sciences with Specialization in Atmospheric Sciences and is currently employed in the field of meteorology.You can find the author as @WeatherInThePeg on Twitter.