Scary Cold

This week will start out scary cold, as it continues to feel more like January than early December.

Monday morning will be extremely cold in southern Manitoba
Monday morning will be extremely cold in southern Manitoba

Monday

Monday
-20°C / → -20°C
Mainly Sunny

This morning will likely feature the coldest temperatures we’ve seen so far this winter. Temperatures will slowly climb toward minus twenty the day, but a gusty south wind will begin to develop as well. By the afternoon the wind will be 40km/h gusting to 60km/h, putting wind chill values in the mid to upper minus thirties. That gusty south wind will also generate patches of heavy blowing and drifting snow in open areas.

Tuesday

Tuesday
-12°C / -20°C
Mix of sun and cloud

Tuesday will be significantly nicer than Monday. Temperatures will be in the minus teens, but the wind will be light and from the west…just that fact alone will make it feel a lot warmer!

Wednesday

Wednesday
-12°C / -25°C
Mainly Sunny

Wednesday will feature much the same weather as Tuesday. Temperatures will once again be in the minus teens, but with a slightly stronger west wind. There may be a few flurries early on Wednesday morning, but nothing of great significance.

Long Range

Long range guidance suggests we’ll see less extreme conditions develop as we move into December. Models are hinting at an upper ridge building over the Prairies about a week or so into December. That doesn’t necessarily mean it will be warm, but conditions that are closer to normal, or perhaps even above-normal should become more prevalent.

Scott

Scott

Scott grew up in Steinbach, Manitoba and joined A Weather Moment in January of 2012. Prior to his involvement with AWM he operated a website called Steinbach Weather, from 2007 until 2011. Steinbach Weather had many similarities to AWM, making for a smooth transition to his new meteorological home. Scott currently writes the Monday morning at AWM and also contributes to some of the unique products available at AWM, including the Manitoba Mesonet. Scott holds a B.Sc. (Hons) in Physical Geography from the University of Manitoba, with specialization in Atmospheric Science. He is currently working on a Master’s Degree at the University of Manitoba, with a focus on elevated convection.