Hang onto your Hat! Severe Wind Storm for Thanksgiving Monday

It will be a very windy Thanksgiving as a strong low pressure system ushers in potentially damaging winds. By the time you’re reading this your loose objects will probably already be in your neighbour’s yard!

Monday

Today will not be the most pleasant Thanksgiving, as rain and strong winds wreck havoc outdoors. A strong low pressure system and corresponding pressure gradient will generate high to extremely high winds over southern Manitoba on Monday. The highest winds are expected Monday morning, when sustained speeds of 60-80km/h, and gusts to 100km/h or more, are expected. The period of extreme gusts likely won’t last more than a few hours, but during that time it will certainly do some damage, not to mention the fact that you’ll have a lot more leaves to rake!

A strong pressure gradient (shown above as tightly packed black lines called isobars) will bring very windy conditions to southern Manitoba on Monday
A strong pressure gradient (shown above as tightly packed black lines called isobars) will bring very windy conditions to southern Manitoba on Monday

Today will also be rather soggy, as moderate rainfall occurs in association with this low pressure system. Today’s rainfall amounts will likely be around 5-15mm in the Red River Valley. You’ll have to wait until at least Tuesday for all those wet leaves to dry out!

Tuesday

Tuesday will be much calmer than Monday. Temperatures will climb into the mid teens under mainly sunny skies. Winds will remain breezy from the west, but they will feel light compared to Monday!

Wednesday

Wednesday will feature much the same weather as Tuesday. Temperatures will be in the low to mid teens under mainly sunny skies. Winds will be breezy from the north-west, but once again it will feel like nothing compared to Monday.

Long Range

Long range models continue to show a strong signal for warmer than normal weather through the end of October. Hopefully this will continue to be the trend as we move into winter due to the effects of El Nino.

Scott

Scott

Scott grew up in Steinbach, Manitoba and joined A Weather Moment in January of 2012. Prior to his involvement with AWM he operated a website called Steinbach Weather, from 2007 until 2011. Steinbach Weather had many similarities to AWM, making for a smooth transition to his new meteorological home. Scott currently writes the Monday morning at AWM and also contributes to some of the unique products available at AWM, including the Manitoba Mesonet. Scott holds a B.Sc. (Hons) in Physical Geography from the University of Manitoba, with specialization in Atmospheric Science. He is currently working on a Master’s Degree at the University of Manitoba, with a focus on elevated convection.